April 25

“Ahsoka Quinn” as a Star Wars/Batman Cosplay Mashup

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Knightsgarrison recently posted her Ahsoka Tano/Harley Quinn mashup on Imgur, because a friend (pictured above) wanted to cosplay as Ahsoka at Star Wars Celebration, but knowing that Ahsoka is to Star Wars as Harley Quinn is to literally every other con in the world, we figured…they’d just do both. It was her first time building something so involved and she learned (and screwed up) a lot along the way. She’s pretty proud of the results.

The seams drove her crazy. Luckily, it’s canon that Ahsoka sometimes wears head/lekku jewelry, so she bought some studded ribbon and glued it on. It doesn’t hide everything, but it helps a lot.

Total build time was 24 hours, spread it out over a month, and the total cost was about $100.

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And as a total score, Knightsgarrison’s friend got a picture with the voice of Ahsoka herself: Ashley liked it so much she asked her assistant to take a picture with her own phone.

January 15

Yakko Warner at RCCC

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This is actually the second time I’ve posted about a Yakko Warner cosplay, and I think this one takes the cake!

Brady Danger Gage creates amazing costumes. This Yakko Warner was created for the 2016 Rose City Comic Con in Oregon. Brady also made Wakko and Dot Warner costumes as well, AND he created costumes for those costumes: Batman for Yakko, Superman for Wakko, and Wonder Woman for dear little Dot. They were surprises for the awesome Keith Tucker, based on his own artwork.

And if you click here, you’ll be able to watch a short video of Rob Paulsen, talented voice-over artist and the voice of Yakko, meeting the Animaniac in real life.

From a practical point of view, if you’ve ever thought about making a mascot-type foam head for a costume, you might want to check out Brady’s Facebook page. He’s got a series of pictures that show how to stack the foam, how to start sketching on the faces, and how to wrap it in fabric. It’s a good tutorial.

December 18

Yub Nub Scoodie

In just a day, I’m going away for Christmas. I’ll be leaving a place that’s currently 66 degrees and going to a place that’s -5 degrees. As a project to help pass the time on my flights, and something to keep me warm once I’m there, I’ll be crocheting Kristen Stevenson’s Yub Nub (Ewok hood) scoodie. This is a free pattern on Ravelry, but you will need to make a username and password to get it.

I am going to make one change to it though. Kristen has directions on how to make the Ewok ears. However, I’m going to find a thrift store once I get a chance, buy a really nice looking teddy bear, and cut off his ears to attach to the hood, for just a touch more realism.

And if you aren’t familiar with the Ewoks, they are a fictional race of small, mammaloid bipeds that appear in the Star Wars universe. They are hunter-gatherers resembling teddy bears that inhabit the forest moon of Endor and live in various arboreal huts and other simple dwellings. They first appeared in the 1983 film Star Wars Ep. VI: Return of the Jedi, and have since appeared in two made-for-television films, Caravan of Courage: An Ewok Adventure (1984) and Ewoks: The Battle for Endor (1985), as well as a short-lived animated series and several books and games.

Merry Christmas, everyone!

December 10

Knitting and Crocheting for Good

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So today’s entry is a little different and comes to us because of a letter in a recent Dear Abby column: The Knitted Knockers Support Foundation. How many of us know someone who’s had, or continues to have, breast cancer?

Knitted Knockers are special handmade breast prosthesis for women who have undergone mastectomies or other procedures to the breast. Traditional breast prosthetics are usually expensive, heavy, sweaty and uncomfortable. They typically require special bras or camisoles with pockets and can’t be worn for weeks after surgery. Knitted Knockers on the other hand are soft, comfortable, beautiful and when placed in a regular bra they take the shape and feel of a real breast. Their special volunteer knitters provide these free to those requesting them. Knitted knockers can be adjusted to fill the gap for breasts that are uneven and easily adapted for those going through reconstruction by simply removing some of the stuffing.

Their website provides patterns to knit or crochet knockers. Women can also come and request a knocker in the size and color they want. In addition, they provide a how to guide on how to choose approved yarns, how to start your own Knitted Knocker group in your area, or how to find existing groups.

December 4

Mini R2D2 Pattern

Mia posted her mini R2-D2 pattern back in 2002, on her crochet site. This Mini R2-D2 measures about 17cm. The idea to make R2-D2 came to Mia from a birthday gift for a friend, who really likes Star Wars.

This time, Mia decided to innovate and used some LEDs on R2-D2, so, it works as a small lamp. But the pattern can be worked without the electronic parts. You can replace the LEDs for some buttons.

The difficult part of this pattern it isn’t the crochet, but the collage, because there are to many details to cut and glue! Mia recommends to pay attention on the photos and to search on the web for R2-D2 photos, so, you can have a good idea of what you will need to do.

November 13

Crochet BMO Scarf

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Rose Henderson actually wrote this crochet pattern in 2014, but since the southeast part of the United States is finally starting to get chilly, I thought it was time to share this.

Rose said her 9 year old asked if she could make him a scarf that no–one else had at school. They compiled a list of his favorite TV programs, had a look around to see what was available in local stores and whittled the list down to BMO from Adventure Time. Thoughtfully, Rose posted her entire tutorial on this scarf on her blog, and even included a PDF of the pieces of BMO’s face, to trace onto felt.

Amazingly enough, this was Rose’s first crochet tutorial and it’s very clear and concise.