November 21

Gift A Geek: Geeky Ornaments

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The Holidays are coming! The Holidays!  Currently its early enough that you can still make something, or get gifts to decorate for the holidays. So we are going to start with geeky ornaments. Hallmark is surprisingly good at this, but we have so many options, from making to buying. And its not too late to start making!

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For the Geek Crafter/Soon to Be Crafter

 

For the Geek Shopper

Geeky_treasury

I’ve put together a treasury list of a variety of geeky ornaments one can find from a variety of sellers on Etsy. They are  a mix of shapes, styles, and fandoms and nearly all the shops cover more than the fandom pictured. So I would say give it a click through and enjoy.

 

November 14

Agents of Shield: Alien Script Scarf

ConcertiGrossi_alienglyph

Agents of Shield, is the show that kept slowly worming its way into my heart, and now I’m glad I stuck with it. And speaking of worming its way, Coulson has been having some issues with some Alien writing for some time now. He finally has some answers, and we have a pattern for a scarf to wear.

ConcertiGrossi over on Tumblr created the  charts so you can have your own alien script without having to visit Tahiti, I hear it’s a magical place. It is a double knit scarf, which means you work both sides at the same time and end up with a mirror image of what you are working on.

Category: Comics, Craft, Geek, Sci-Fi, TV | 1 Comment
November 2

Marvel craft: DIY LED Tesseract

Tesseract tutorial by Venessa Baez

Did you know that in geometry, a tesseract, also called an 8-cell or regular octachoron or cubic prism, is the four-dimensional analog of the cube? According to Wolfram MathWorld, in Madeleine L’Engle’s novel, A Wrinkle in Time, the characters in the story travel through time and space using tesseracts. According to Google, Tesseract is also probably the most accurate open source OCR engine available.

Of course, in the Marvel universe, there is yet another use of a Tesseract – as an Infinity Stone, one of the most powerful artifacts in the universe. It can open rifts in space, which ties in nicely with Madeleine L’Engle’s use of it. While Odin keeps watch over the Tesseract in Asgard, you can create your own replica based on this quick project by Venessa Baez (complete with 3-1/2 minute video). With an acrylic photo cube, a few swipes of paint, some LED garden lights, and waxed paper, you can have a great geeky decor item for your desk or bookshelf.

If you could open a rift in time and space, where would you go? And would you make the “Vwoop, vwoop!” sound effect like a TARDIS?

October 19

Scott Pilgrim craft: Ramona Flowers hammer

Ramona Flowers hammer by Mia Moore

At the cons I have attended, I see a ton of creative cosplay (people dressed up in costumes representing characters from books, movies, TV, manga, etc.). I can pretty safely guarantee I’ll see a variety of fandoms represented – almost always Star Trek, Star Wars, and Doctor Who. I always enjoy seeing other characters, however, and recognizing their references. Makes me feel a little self-righteous in my geekhood.

That’s why I was tickled to recently find this tutorial on a Ramona Flowers cosplay, from the graphic novel series, video game and movie, Scott Pilgrim. We have enjoyed watching the movie several times at our house, and my daughter has read the books. Mia did a great job breaking down the steps to creating the iconic hammer in her tutorial, right down to the bell on the end of the handle – great attention to detail! She also gives tips on how she was able to travel by plane with the hammer!

Be sure to check out other examples of Mia’s cosplay wizardry – such as Daenerys Targaryen from Game of Thrones, Fiona from Adventure Time, and Female Engineer from Team Fortress 2.

October 12

A Super Sewing Project

Super Hero shirt by Annie Case Hanks

I must admit that among my many crafting hobbies and interests, sewing is probably the one at which I am least adept. I often see sewing projects on blogs and Pinterest and marvel at how the seamstresses are able to whip things together and customize projects to challenging fabrics or body shapes.

I recently cyber-met sewing whiz Annie Case Hanks via the Female Geek Bloggers G+ Community, and did a little squee when I saw this Marvel-based shirt she sewed for her son. I was impressed that she took an indie-designer pattern and geeked it out with some Marvel-licensed fabric, modifying it a bit to suit her husband’s/son’s tastes. While I often stray from paper crafting instructions and examples, veering off from sewing directions terrifies me, so kudos to Annie for her sewing prowess!

I love her idea to add just a strip of the comic book art fabric – sometimes those licensed or fandom-inspired fabrics are pretty busy, so a full project made from the fabric might be a bit much, but a two-inch strip at the collar or hem might be just the right touch of geek flair.

BTW, Annie’s blog name is also geeky – “The Enantiomer Project” refers to a chemistry term for a stereoisomer which has a mirror image. She likes to think of those enantiomers when it comes to her sewing projects, and considers her blog her “lab notebook” of sewing projects, with all of the materials, procedures, and products. By day she is a science professor, and by night, a “sewing mad scientist.” Girl crush.

Have you ever strayed from directions to geekify a project? How did that go for you?

October 4

A Crocheted Cosplay

barda

I love a good crochet project as much as the next geek, and gaylefrancis just took it up a notch, with her crocheted Big Barda costume.

Gaylefrancis said with the exception of the hexagons, she didn’t use any patterns. The legs, torso, and gauntlets are crocodile stitch. The cape is triple crochet. The rest of it is half-double. The megarod is single crochet with bubble stitch on the top and the buttons were stitched on separately.

For those of you not in the know, Big Barda is a fictional comic book superheroine appearing in books published by DC Comics. She first appeared in Mister Miracle #4 (October 1971), and was created by Jack Kirby.